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Qualities of a truly loyal employee

 
 


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No doubt that time has changed. These days there’s a decreasing sense of commitment to companies by employees. Loyalty is not something a company can rely on anymore. However, as scarce as loyalty has become, it remains an asset to the company and to the employer.

So, what are the qualities of a loyal employee?

First of all, and for us to make things clear, with regards to employees, loyalty has nothing to do with blind obedience, or unthinking devotion, or length of tenure.

Loyal employees are loyal to your company. They work hard for their pay and are committed to your company's success. However, truly loyal employees are not just committed to helping their companies succeed; their loyalty is also displayed in many other ways.

1. They display loyalty through integrity.

Many people assume loyalty is proven through obedience: Often unthinking and unquestioning, even when a request or directive falls into a gray area or, worse, is unethical or illegal.

An employee who consistently seeks to do the right thing is not just following a personal credo – he’s also looking out for your long-term interests.

2. They generate discussions others will not.

Many employees hesitate to voice their opinions or feelings in a group setting. Some even hesitate to voice their opinions in private.

Loyal employees have a great feel for the issues and concerns of the people around them, and they ask the questions or raise the important issues when others won’t.

3. They praise their peers.

Truly loyal employees care: About the company, about its customers, about its mission… they feel they’re working for something greater than just themselves. So they appreciate when another employee does something great because that means the company is fulfilling its mission.

4. They dissent and disagree

Loyal employees share their opinions, even when they know you may not initially appreciate those opinions, because they want the company to be better tomorrow than it is today. And they’ll occasionally take stands against a point of view or decision.

5. They support in public.
After a decision is made, loyal employees get behind that decision even if they privately disagree. They support the decision as if it were their own – because when you’re loyal, every decision is, ultimately, your own.

A truly loyal employee puts aside his feelings and actively tries to make every decision the right decision – instead of willing it to fail so they can prove themselves right.

6. They tell you what you least want to hear.

Truly loyal employees know that what you least want to hear may be what you – and by extension your company – most need to hear: That an initiative won’t work, that a decision-making process is flawed, that a mistake has been made… truly loyal employees realize that while you may not like what you hear, ultimately you want to hear it because what matters most is doing what is best for your employees, your customers, and your company.

Well-intended silence can be a good sign of loyalty; speaking up, especially when it’s awkward or even painful to do so, can be the best sign.

7. They leave when they need to leave.
A truly loyal employee is almost always a sensational employee; they often do their best not to leave the company. Yet sometimes they do: For a different lifestyle, for a better opportunity, for a chance to move to a different industry, or simply to take what they’ve learned and start their own company.

When it’s time, they tell you it’s time to leave – and they help you prepare to fill the hole they create.

Hope that these qualities would provide employers with a better insight on the loyal employees and give the employees few guidelines on how to become loyal employees.


 

 

 

The Business Lobby Team

 



 
1  available comment(s)

Commented By: Samir Mustafa El Hage
The first thing that it comes in mind when you talk about loyalty is fidelity, trustworthy, strong principles,...but mainly strive to uplift the interest of the company above your own interests. One of the most difficult task is to be detail oriented - in silent and analyse... then make a right decision speaking up against a "Comfort Zone" that is harmful for both sides..Strong leaders must be a leaders by example, visionary, extra-ordinary.to succeed...instead of "laissez-faire" style.


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